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A Roman settlement  
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If Roman ruins are what you seek, Tarragona and Merida are two cities in Spain that are chock-full of them.
Tarragona's main sights:
Tarragona Home
More pages will be forthcoming on Tarragona. In the meantime check out the links at the bottom of this column.
Rambla Nova
The Amfiteatre
Museu Romanitat, Praetorium and Roman Circus
Train Station
Museu i Necropolis Paleocristians

Bibliography for Tarragona Pages

Travel Now info: (from the Rough Guide)
Tarragona
Old Town
Roman Tarragona
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Above photo - The Roman amphitheater also contains the remains of a church from the 1100's A.D.
Tarragona is located on the Mediterranean and is an active industrial port. It can easily be reached from Barcelona by train or bus.

Photo Right -The view as one enters the Praetorian

I had read that the premier Roman attraction in Tarragona is the Museu i Necropolis Paleocristians.


Photo Above - Excavations at the Museu i Necropolis Paleocristians.
The book indicated the museum is only a twenty-minute walk from the center of town, so off we headed. After about 30 minutes, we reach the entrance to the museum grounds; taking a ramp downward, we find our path is blocked by a gate. Almost by accident, we notice a door in the wall. Pushing on it, we discover a small museum under the sidewalk. We soon learn that due to a lack of funds, the excavations that are the heart of the museum have been closed to the visitor for several years.
Running into the unexpected often leaves one with a travel memory to treasure.

I had not planned our time in Tarragona well. I wanted to get some photos of the old city wall, but it was already getting dark.

Walking in the wall's general direction we see fewer and fewer natives in the street. Then turning a corner, we spy a young gentlemen on stilts, hanging onto a traffic sign. My companion and I wait, thinking we'll soon be treated to a display of stilt walking.  I take out my camera and snap the photo above. Minutes go by and we decide we'd better be moving on. As the young man starts to fade from view, I take one quick glance back. Still motionless, he clings to the sign. Later I wonder to myself, "How does one get off stilts that high?"


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Information on this page is from my October 2003 visit to Spain.